Jump to content
Y-coach.com - Forum

Coach G of BT

Members
  • Content Count

    17
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Average Coach

About Coach G of BT

  • Rank
    Coach
  1. First let me say that as the Head Coach you have certain obligations to your players. One if not the biggest is to make it fun for them. You have to have a Coaches meeting at the begionning of the year with your asst. coaches and let them know what you expect of them. As far as using fathers of players for coaches that is a situation I try to avoid. It can be a no win situation. If the fathers son is a stud, there will be parents who say it's preferential treatment. If the kid is not very good he will probably hear it from his spouse and child. Been there. But as far as your team and players go it is your responsibility to make sure that not only your Asst. Coaches but your parents are met with as early in the season as possible. You have to let the Coaches know what is to be done, how it will be done, and why. Let the parents know you make the decisions as far as who plays and who doesn't. Let them know that it is their duty to work with you to make it fun for the child. You have to let them know you will not put a player in a situation that they are not ready to face. Some players learn faster than others, have more experience. Ask your parents to help you keep their childs attitude positive. Regardless of playing time or record of your team. Often the parents are the ones who put negative thoughts into their childs head and then blame it on the child. Most kids just want to have fun. Practice is often enough for manby kids if brought across the right way. You have to take the weight off the shoulders of your Asst. Coaches, but let them know you are the one who has to answer to the board and parents and that as long as they do what you ask there will be no problems. All Coaches have to be on the same page, teaching things one way, which is determined by you. Your preseason meeting will allow your asst. coaches to address any ideas they may have so that when practices start if they have any good ideas or a better way to get where your going, you can put that in your practice. Good Luck
  2. I believe your are running the wrong defense. If you run a 6-2 you will be pulling two of you lineman off the line and giving them time to react to the ball. If the play goes outside, Which is the most commonly ran play at this age, they are their to support the ends and the corners. Teach the linebackers to work as a duo. Keep seperation between them, just a couple of yards, incase the first backer overpursues the second one is there. The trailer will also be in position for any cut backs made by the running backs. Teach your Def. Ends to try and push the play inside, thats where 9 other players are at. If the play gets outside the End make sure the Cornerbacks do not let the play get outside his far shoulder. On the Backside teach your Def. End that anytime the play appears to be going away from him that his responsibility is to watch the QB for a bootleg, or any reverses. Also make sure they do not penetrate the Offense any deeper than the ball, otherwise the backs will just cut inside of them. Backside Corner also must stay home until the ball breaks the LOS on the far side then pursue deep. People will always have different opinions on what to do, but bottom line is having the kids well coached and disciplined to their responsibilities. Lastly as far as your undersized Lineman, if you teach them properly it could be to your advantage to have smaller quicker lineman at this age. My problem has always been that parents of larger kids believe that simply because their child is bigger that makes them a better candidate for the line. The disadvantage is that at this age most teams play their starting players both ways. A heavier out of shape kid will slow down as the game progresses while an athlete will always be ready and quicker usally. Just my opinion. Good Luck
  3. I Coach 5,6,and 7 year olds. I use both a number for the holes and Backs as well as designating as name for each hole. Some of the kids at this age have problems with numbers. So giving them both prepares them for upper divisions but lets them know where the ball is going now. One problem is making sure they know their left from right. This is how we number and call our holes: Full House Offensive set 7----End----5----Tackle----3----Guard----1----Center----2----Guard----4----Tackle----6----End-----8 Sweep------Power-----------Slam-----------Dive------------Dive-----------Slam----------Power--------Sweep Quarterback (#1) Left Halfback (# 4)-----Fullback (#3)------Right Halfback (#2) Using names and numbers helps those kids who have problems with numbers recognize the holes. Hope it helps. Coach G
  4. Thank you very much for the info. The numbering of the holes and backs helps me tremendously. I will have someone helping me with the defense so I am going to spend much of my time working on our offense. We will be working close together to make sure we understand each other of course. What I am thinking is that we are going to start with a I formation and mix it up a little. What do you think? I know the kids that are coming back this year and that we should be able to teach it to them pretty quick. My thought is this. The I formation will allow our kids to lineup the same way everytime, and allow us to mix it up. Maybe a bootleg and a naked bootleg with a fake pitch. Thats what I have in sight for the first plays to work on. Once we start practice we will have only 3 weeks to prepare for the first game. Besides working on some running plays I am thinking for the first few practices of coming up with ways of learning each childs abilities like speed, agility, strength, etc.... I want to make it fun for the kids and competitive. My goals are to teach them FUN, TEAM, DISCIPLINE, and RESPECT and do it in a way that is not forcing it down them. My theory is this. Have fun, learn to work as a team and the discipline and respect will follow. If we have fun we can't be beat even if we lose. Like I said in my previous post I am new to coaching football so I am not yet set in my game plan so if my thinking is wrong about my choice of plays to start off with please let me know. I have been preparing my practice plans so that I know what I am doing. From warm ups to having a water boy/girl and rapping it up at the end. If I am not organized then I can't expect the kids to be either. Some more ideas I have is to have trivia questions for them about the game. If our league will allow me I want to use the stickers like the colleges do. I want the kids to have something to work towards and be proud of. Most of the kids don't uderstand that ultimately all week you are working on winning on Saturday which doesn't give them much to work towards during the week. I want to keep them excited at practice and at the games. However because one of my main goals is TEAM I am thinking I can acheive this with the kids help by letting them help to pick out the kid that stood out during that practice/game. I do believe in rewarding the kids that strive to do better, and not do it because it may upset another one. I have so much running through my head that I can't get it written down quick enough to remember later. Thanks again for your advice. I also plan on checking out some of the free playbooks to see what other running plays are out there we could work on adding at a later time as you suggested. Thanks again.
  5. Pitchers, catchers, and shortstops all use different muscles when throwing. A pitch uses more leg and back muscles as they push off the rubber trying to get maximum velocity on their fastballs. I agree that the warm up period is very important, but there are many factors that go into how many pitches a pitcher should throw before starting to throw to batters. Temp, humidity, personnal muscle mass, and I agree to some extent whether the player is warmed up from being in the game at another position. I don't think this will effect the number of pitches he can throw in the game unless he was playing catcher. This is the one position I believe takes a toll on a young players arm if not properly warmed up. Especially if there is stealing in your League or Division. One of my best relief pitchers is also my sarting catcher, when he come in there is very litttle time spent warming up. Its more getting used to throwing from the rubber and finding his pace. This works for my kids, I've never had a kid with a sore arm, but I make sure not to over use them in any one game and get at least 3 days rest between work.
  6. I'm looking for ideas for fund raising that can be done during the winter or if need be spring. I want to raise enough to replace our game shirts with new shirts with the kids names on them. I also want to embroider their #'s on their hats. as far as sponsors go we would be willing to acknowledge the sponsor for two years if they buy Shirts and hats. We have new pants and socks. Also I heard of some organizations that have equipment sponsors. I'm not sure how that works but would like to know if anyone has any experience with this or how I may approach corp.'s or small business sponsors. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
  7. Sorry, I must have hit add reply twice. Started and finished at two sitting, didn't mean to write "As Coach Steve" at the bottom. I had started it and when I got back lost track. This is why I'm not a computer programmer or data entry person. Again Sorry all.
  8. Sorry, I must have hit add reply twice. Started and finished at two sitting, didn't mean to write "As Coach Steve" at the bottom. I had started it and when I got back lost track. This is why I'm not a computer programmer or data entry person. Again Sorry all.
  9. Bottom line is that the Head Coach must be the MAN. He should organize and utilize his Asst. Coaches where he feels they will best suit his type of Coaching. He has to be organized and almost like a small business manager. Everyone has to give the Title the resect it deserves for that year at least. Issues should be worked out pre season and during the off season at coaches or organizational meetings. If everyone's not happy with the way things are done then don't ask that person back as Head Coach. Remember though that a Head Coaches responsibilities are drastically different than those of asst. coaches. They must deal with off field issues, parents, officials, and the organizations directors just to mention a few. New Head Coaches may need a year or two to adjust to these differences, so try to be understanding. If this person was a good Asst. Coach who knew football, he hasn't changed, he may however realize that head coaching is not for him and thats OK. Remember the most important criteria a Coach must meet is their willingness to do whats best for the kids. Unfortunately many parents forget that this is only a game, and that there are more things to be taught than X's and O's. To often our organizations parents and supporters rate a Head Coach based on wins and loses, especially if he is a New Head Coach. Coaching staffs are the heart of any organization, so make sure you have a strong, well working staff and your kids will be the better for it. As Coach Steve said, as far as Asst. Coaches titles, as long as everyone does their role they are not important, only the Head Coaches title is important because he will be the one people look to for explainations, good or bad. As Coach Steve
  10. Bottom line is that the Head Coach must be the MAN. He should organize and utilize his Asst. Coaches where he feels they will best suit his type of Coaching. He has to be organized and almost like a small business manager. Everyone has to give the Title the resect it deserves for that year at least. Issues should be worked out pre season and during the off season at coaches or organizational meetings. If everyone's not happy with the way things are done then don't ask that person back as Head Coach. Remember though that a Head Coaches responsibilities are drastically different than those of asst. coaches. They must deal with off field issues, parents, officials, and the organizations directors just to mention a few. New Head Coaches may need a year or two to adjust to these differences, so try to be understanding. If this person was a good Asst. Coach who knew football, he hasn't changed, he may however realize that head coaching is not for him and thats OK. Remember the most important criteria a Coach must meet is their willingness to do whats best for the kids. Unfortunately many parents forget that this is only a game, and that there are more things to be taught than X's and O's. To often our organizations parents and supporters rate a Head Coach based on wins and loses, especially if he is a New Head Coach. Coaching staffs are the heart of any organization, so make sure you have a strong, well working staff and your kids will be the better for it. As Coach Steve
  11. In our League no team is permitted to carry more than: (1) Head Coach (6) Assisstant Coaches (1) Statistition (1) Trainer or Medic (2) Water Boys How these Asst. Coaches are used as far as Offensive Coordinator, Defensive Coordinator, or Position Coaches is completely at the discretion of the Head Coaches. Most of the younger division teams have a Head Coach who usually runs both 1st Team Offense and Defense, and other Coaches running the 2nd and if enough players the 3rd and 4th team squads. The rest of the coaches not running a squad are helpers to each of the other teams squad Coaches. When not running as squads the individual position or drill areas are ran by a different Coach to teach proper fundamentals, Stance, Firing Out, Tackling, Accepting a Hand Off andCarrying the ball etc... As the kids get older the players need less individual attention so there are more true position coaches O Coordinators and D Coordinators. It ruly depends on the number of kids on each team as to how many coaches the Head Coach may try to get.
  12. I would say to you that no one wants to feel like their team is being expected to play by different rules than their opponents, but it happens. I would remind you that there are more important things than winning even if you feel cheated. Like setting a good example for your players who are constantly looking to and at us to learn how they should react to certain situations. If one of your players was being held constantly or something else we would tell them we will be watching to see if it continues but to keep playing hard because somethings are just part of the game and the refs can't see everything on every play. Now I'm not saying that if your having to deal with Coaching staffs switching Helmets, and just outright disregarding the rules at set by the League that you don't have complaints, but I think how you address these issues both during and after the game are being observed by your players. If some one blitzed us with 4-5 blitzers I'd have to address it to the White Hat. But in the interum and if they didn't do anything to stop the other team from breaking rules set by the league, I'd take advantage of their over aggresive blitzing by calling plays set up to counter a blitzing defense such as quick pitches or pop passes, etc... I'd change up my cadance going on two, qick counts on ready or set. There are plays that will stop a team from blitzing every play. I would say to you that football is a very emotional game and it is very easy to get caught up and lose perspective of what we as Coaches and parents are supposed to be doing and thats teaching our kids that there is more to athletics than catching, blocking, throwing and winning. We have to teach them how to win and lose with dignity even if they feel they were playing under unfair conditions. Don't let your kids see you lose your cool, they'll think its OK for them to do it. Take your issues up with the League, take any film or proof you have and challenge them to help make your League a place where every team is playing by the same rules and if someone purposely breaks them there will be consiquences. That the reputation and legitamousy of the League can only be hurt by allowing these kind of things to continue. Believe me when I say your not the first and you wont be the last to get caught up, but we have to take a page out of our own coaching manual and learn from our mistakes. Good luck to you and your League. If someone does'nt correct these infractions it will eventually effect you all. Just my opinion.
  13. When we Coach 5,6,7, & 8 yr olds, especially kids that lack natural aggression, I've found it beneficial to start kids hitting a 48 inch tall tackling dummy. Teaching them proper form tackling and going 100% instead of slowing up prior to making a tackle or before being hit if a ball carrier. Make sure if you don't know proper form tackling that you, and your Asst. Coaches know how it is supposed to be done before teaching it. I say this because youth football is different than higher level age groups. Many old Coaches teach kids to "Stick Your Helmet Right in their Numbers", their chest. This is old school, tacklers helmets should be in front of ball carrier if angle tackling, to the side if Head On (Ball Side) and WRAP THOSE ARMS AROUND THE BALL CARRIER. Most kids reluctant to make contact want to tackle to erect with their chest or grab bing for a piece of Jersey. A Tackling Dummy allow a kid to get comfortable with hitting something that does'nt hit back, while learning proper technique. Once they start showing good form, ease them into full contact. Start with drills that only have short amounts of seperation between the Ball Carrier and the Tackler which keeps the speed to a minimum. Also make sure to put them against someone of equal size, and ability. Stress proper form, remember doing something wrong just means your getting better at doing it wrong. Another point I make is simple Physics, two object moving towards each other at equal speed with equal or similar mass will stop each other, but two objects with equal or similar mass moving at different speeds will result in the slower object being moved backwards. Of course you have to bring it down to their level. I show them by allowing them to hit the tackling dummy while its hanging from my arm, of course when they hit it it moves in the dirrection they are going in. Next I swing the bag into them with enough speed to make my point. If swinging fast enough a forty pound bag can move a 60 - 80 lb player backwards or at least stop them, while not hurting them. Proper form and full speed, this will keep them from getting hurt. Lastly, and I should have said first, you have to have their trust. If they don't trust you they'll never try it until they learn the hard way if ever. Good Luck from a Coach who had this problem with my own son who has exceptional speed but is small an not aggressive. I'd be interested in hearing any other ideas, because frankly this is one of the biggest issues youth coaches have to deal with as far as players go. One other thing, my son started playing corner when he was 7, he had trouble because of his lack of wanting to get hit. We moved him to "D" Line and he was a Beast. Because of his speed he got off the ball very quick, getting more than his share of sacks and tackles in the backfield. I believe this was because the backs never got up to full speed. Once he got his confidence and realized we were telling him the truth, he came around. Now he's a much more aggressive football player, back to playing corner, safety and running the ball. Good Luck
  14. I assume you mean to be ready for Freshman Football. If your son has never played Organized ball he has a lot of things to learn. I don't think any kid should be expected to compete with equally talented athletes with as much as 7-8 years of organized youth football experience. Not only do the kids who have played organized ball understand the little nuances of the game, but the coaches from the high schools know who the prospects for certain positions are. Especially the skilled positions. If your son is the athlete you think he is and has played other organized sports he does have some things going for him. He understands the importance of Hard Work, Dedication, Reliability, Teamwork and Respect just to mention a few. I would recommend you try finding some Football Camps for him. This will teach him some of the things that he be expected to know. Talk to the high school coaches and ask for their input. Bottom line is your son is playing catch up. Be as supportive as you can with out putting any additional pressure on him. When he gets to the high school level the pressure just to make the team will be as high as the teams National Ranking. Remember its a game and he's supposed to be having fun. Every parent wants their child to be the Quarterback or star Running Back, but remember that the coaches assess talent and ability based on whats best for the entire team. They will put your child where he best fits into their program. I don't want to come accross as negative, there's always that natural athlete who can step into any sport and excel. Just don't place to high or unreal expectations on your son. Hard work and a willingness to succeed will certainly help him to reach his potential. But it may take a year or two. If your son can be patient and play at his age level he will be alright. I've seen kids sit the bench on a JV our Varsity team instead of playing at their age level and getting valuable playing time and experience. Not to mention confidence from succeeding. Good Luck
  15. Congratulations to your sons team. As far as whether it is too difficult for 11-12 yr olds, I believe it depends on the athletisism of the QB and the Backs. We run a triple option that I think is easier for this age group. We tell our QB to pitch early if he's going to, for two reasons, the first reason is indesiceveness leads to late pitches, which leads to fumbles and worse. 2nd we have our backside TE or Wing run a pattern just behind the Linebackers mirroring the QB. If the defense is over aggressive and plays the run he dumps to the reciever. This is an easier pass to make than you might think, a quarterback who is running even with a reciever does not have to lead him like they do if the QB is set and the Reciever is running. Bringing the backside TE or WB across will keep them honest even if the pass is incomplete. This is a play that also can be thrown by the running back. As far as blocking responsibilities that depends on what type of defense they run. If you can pass at all this is a very good play. It works very well inside the twenty. Our 10-11 yr old team, our Junior Squad won last years Superbowl on the last play of the game last year against a Team that beat us in the regular season. It was added for them because they played an aggressive run defense. Good Luck next week.
×
×
  • Create New...