Bert

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About Bert

  • Rank
    MVP

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  • MSN
    eambrinkman@msn.com
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Profile Information

  • Location
    the Netherlands
  • Interests
    Coaching, Volleyball, youth and mini-volleyball, sport psychology
  1. The Dutch Volleybal Federation (Nevobo) is seeking for methods/ways tot increase the number of boys in our sport. Since the start of Cool Moves Volley (volleyball for 6-12 years) a lot of kids started with volleybal, but much more girls then boys. I was told that's also a problem in the USA too, largely due to American football, which is your number 1 boys sport and has over a million athletes playing at the school level. I was wondering, what is your experience, what do you do to get boys play volleyball??? Thanks for any reaction, information! Bert Brinkman Teacher Volleyball Academy and member projecteam Mini-Volleyball Nevobo
  2. I'm coaching both youth and adult volleybalteams. I'm teacher for the dutch volleybal federation (Nevobo), teaching new coaches. I'm also member of the mini-volleyball adviseteam of the Nevobo and editor of Volley Techno, the magazine for volleyball coaches in the Netherlands and Belgium

  3. I don't know what centipede is, but if you, or others, want to play a fun game, play bossaball (www.bossaballo.com) ........
  4. Hello, Ik was wondering. Is there anybodu who have ever heard of the SAQ methode from Alan Pearson? SAQ means: speed, agility en quickness. It is a method primair used in soccer. Next week there is a coach in my club (the coach of our boys selectionteam under 18) who organise a clinic with this subject. I really don't know what it is, I have seen pictures (on the website of my club: www.dros-alterno.nl) but I was wondering, is someone already use it in a volleyball setting? Bert
  5. Hello John and others, Here is the presentation I used for that meeting. It's in dutch, but perhaps you can translate it...... When someone have questions or like to know more please sent me a e-mail. With kind regards, Bert
  6. Hello everybody, I am searching for exercises or skills to learn children to focus on volleyball. I think the fact that some children have problems with there concentration or to focus on a part of the game, for example the serve, is a problem everybody knows about??? Thanks for you're reactions! Bert
  7. Hello John and others, I have had my presentation about 'coaches who never lose'. It turn out in a great discussion. The funiest thing was that some of the coaches from our selectionteams uderstand the ideas behind 'the coach who never lose' very well. Some other coaches doesn't agree in the first place and they say that they think there can be other goals to set and other rules to work with. In the discussion it become clear that they also like the ideas behind this filosophy of coaching youth. I recieved the book 'the double goal coach' last week and I am busy to read it. John would you like the powerpoint presentation? I have also some other, very interesting information, about for example drop-outs in sport and motivation for youth to stop of going on in sport. Bert
  8. Hello John, It's great to read you're reaction! I don't have had the meeting, it will be in the last week of august. I am very courious about the reactions on that meeting too, just because I know some coaches inside our club have different ideas. The 'book' of Smith & Small is translated in dutch, by a sport psychologist, I have ask here to join this meeting. When I have had the meeting I will tell you in this in this forum! bert
  9. Hello again, Here I am again. My name is Bert Brinkman and I am a dutch youth volleyball coach. Besides that I am also one of the editors of Volley Techno, the magazine for volleyball coaches in the Netherlands and Belgium. For my club (Dros Alterno) I am busy to organize a meeting about coaching. The key issue in this meeting will be the book from Frank L. Small and Ronald E. Smith: "Coaches who never lose ..... making sure athletes win, no matter what the score". I think this is a very import 'book'. I was wondering: 1. do you know this way of coaching? 2. is there some one who can help me with a powerpoint presentation about 'coaches who never lose' (so I can use some parts of it in my meeting for our coaches? Thanks for any reaction! Bert p.s. I have post this message also in the volleyball forum, but ....... it maybe also a general topic!
  10. Hello again, Here I am again. My name is Bert Brinkman and I am a dutch youth volleyball coach. Besides that I am also one of the editors of Volley Techno, the magazine for volleyball coaches in the Netherlands and Belgium. For my club (Dros Alterno) I am busy to organize a meeting about coaching. The key issue in this meeting will be the book from Frank L. Small and Ronald E. Smith: "Coaches who never lose ..... making sure athletes win, no matter what the score". I think this is a very import 'book'. I was wondering: 1. do you know this way of coaching? 2. is there some one who can help me with a powerpoint presentation about 'coaches who never lose' (so I can use some parts of it in my meeting for our coaches? Thanks for any reaction! Bert
  11. Hello zanners, I can only tell you about the way I do handle thinks like this. I my opinion volleyball is like to go on vacation. This is also what I told the kids I coach. When I go on vacation the first thing I to is to find a place, a country for example to go to. Then I find out the ways to get there, I can go by car or by plane or maybe by boot. So the first thing I do is setting the goal (where to go) and the I think about the way to get there and also the route we must travel. In volleyball or sport in general there are, in my opinion two kind of goals to set. I can set result-goals, like I want to win the next game or I want to be champion ore something like that. The other type of goal I can set are presentation-goals, like I want to learn the kids to spike on position 2 or I like to learn them to serve with a jump serve or something like that. I only use presentation goals. Every start of the season I make a new education plan (in Exell), where you can find every (presentation) goal I set and the way I want to reach this goals. The different between result-goals and presentation-goals is this: when I use the result-goal 'I like to win the next game' and I didn't win the next game I can hardly say something about the season I didn't win this game, and what I must do to win against the same team the next time we play against them. I can say: "Okay, the ware better", but ........ so what? My team can play the best game ever, but they still can lose the game. When I use presentation-goals I always can give good feedback on the way we did reach the goal or not, for example when some one serve a jump serve into the net, I can say something about the reason he did this. So, I my opinion I never play to win the game, we always play to learn something, a technique. In my opinion the competion is part of the whole learning process. In this way of thinking, I always lett the kids play equally. This doesn't mean everyone in the team play equally every game. They must have play equally after the whole season. If you know what I mean. By the way, the theory above, I use and I think is good, isn't from me. It's comming from a american coach, who wrote a good book, called: "coaches who never lose". Good luck. Bert
  12. Another drill is as follow: On one site of the net there are two players, one in the left part of the court, one in the right part of the court. I serve the ball over the net, to the left of to the right. The player in the part of the court where the ball doesn't go to, must sit on the floor, as soon as he or she knows that the ball doesn't go his or her direction. They must try to do this earlier, everytime they do this dril. At the first time it's good when he or she sit on the floor when the ball is going over the net, after that they must 'see' the direction of the ball even when the ball isn't going over the net. A variation on this drill, but more difficult (but more gamelike) is: the same drill, but now, when the player know that the ball doesn't go his or her direction, he is running to net. The other player must play the ball to the net, where the first player must catch this ball. Good luck, when you like to know more, please ask. Bert
  13. Yes, ´dog pile´. The kids laying over each other on the floor, like a ´dog pile´. On the other side of the net, there stand the coach with a ball. He serve with a underhand serve. When he do so, the kids must stand up, the first kid must play the ball with a forearme pass, the second must give a set up and kid 3 or 4 or maybe 5 must spike or play the ball otherwise over the net. It's a great game, where the kids must work together and play volleyball at the same time. Bert
  14. Hello John, If I could I will paint it out, but I couldn't this way. I will sent you a email about it. By the way, I don't prefer 3-1-2 as last part of the eduction. I think a 3-2-1 is a more dynamic system than in a 3-1-2 system. There is another reason. I think that some one should choise for a system that matched with the team. In a 3-1-2 system, the player on position 6, is the one close the the block. Because he or she is always close behind the front players, this is a system with matched with teams with or a good and high block or in a competion where the spike isn't a big problem (so for starting teams). In a 3-2-1 system, in my opinion there is in the first place more transition, it's more dynamic, the player who is behind the block is most of the times no so close behind the block. This is a system used in a competition where the level of the spike is higher or the level of the block is lower or the players are not so tall (the spikers of the other team could easily spike over the block. There is something else. I think, but who am I, that a W formation is more system in a service reception and not, as above in the defence. Bert
  15. This is funny, over here we play most of the ball with a forearmpass, only the second ball. This is why we learn the forearm pass as the first technique in circulation volleyball. By the way, I saw you're message on the guestbook of Adrie Noy. Does Adrie or perhaps Wilco (the webmaster) sent you a email already? Bert