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Coach_Brewer

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About Coach_Brewer

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  1. I have also used the bats behind the feet but it can be dangerous for youger kids. I now use a 2x4 about 4 feet long and set it behind their feet (about 1-2 inches behind their heels. If they step on it they won't fall (much) but they know its there and if forces them to step to the pitcher. You can also have them close their stance up a bit (front foot little closer to the plate) so when they step in the bucket they will be in the correct position. It's a hard habit to break. If they have a mirror @ home they can practice stepping forward and not in the bucket, this works well too because they can see themselvs doing it. Good luck! -Coach_Brewer
  2. Coach_Brewer

    Best Coaching Video

    Check out the Mike Epstein collection.... http://www.baseball-excellence.com/shopping.cfm?catID=15 Great stuff! -Coach_Brewer
  3. Coach_Brewer

    Getting Frustrated

    I agree it is hard to keep composure after a couple of tough losses, but just remember this, it not about you , its about them. I also have a post game meeting down the foul line in the outfield away from everyone. Ask the players what could they have done diffrently but don't dwell on the mistakes, and always end on a good note. In that age level your batters might only get one good pitch to hit. Teach them to be agressive at the plate and think every pitch is going to be a strike and to drive it hard. There is nothing you can do about the umpires bad calls except hold your head high and tell them you are proud of them. If you do want to talk with the umpire do it after the game or better yet ask the umpires before each game to show your team his strike zone, I ask before every game and have yet had an umpire deny it. I try not to sugar coat things with the team because they know .... somehow they know Keep your head up coach, it will come!! -Coach_Brewer
  4. Coach_Brewer

    Help With Strength For 10 Year Old Son

    bamamike, Coaching baseball now for 6 years has tought me something about strenght at the plate or having "POP". One thing that can always improve power is hitting mechanics, keeping hands back and starting the hips turning before the shoulders etc etc. I am a huge fan of the new super light bats that are out now (-11 to -12.5) to help the kids that do not have that powerful upper body or are just small for their age. For example my 9 year old son weighs just a touch over 60lbs and is almost always the smallest kid on the field, but has better power then kids that are 2 heads taller and weigh much more than him. Why? bat speed and mechanics. Power is bat speed. I don't know how heavy a bat your son is swinging but going just a couple ounces lighter can make a big difference. Hope this helps -Coach_Brewer
  5. Coach_Brewer

    Baseball Radar Gun

    Great!! Let me know how it turns out!!!!!
  6. Coach_Brewer

    Baseball Radar Gun

    Coach 5150, I did a google search on "Glove Radar" and got several sites that carry it. The cost is $65-$70 USD. I am thinking about getting one myself. "The Glove Radar attaches easily to virtually any ballglove and can measure the speed of balls thrown from any distance. Strap it onto any catcher's mitt or fielder's glove. It's not an impact sensor or timer, but a true short-range microwave Doppler radar. The Glove Radar responds just before the thrown ball reaches the glove. Unlike most radar guns, a long range capability is not required. It uses much less power - and costs much less to own"! http://www.gloveradar.com/ http://www.eastbay.com/ http://extremetoysforboys.com/index.php3/i...20Radar%99.html http://mvp.com/sm-sport-sensors-glove-rada...-pi-307871.html -Coach_Brewer
  7. Coach_Brewer

    Baseball Radar Gun

    I have seen these too. They are a small dopplar radar that detects the speed right before the ball hits the mitt. They "say" that it is accurate +- 2-3 mph. -Coach_Brewer
  8. Coach_Brewer

    Power Pitchers

    Its all about timing. Have them "load up" right after the pitcher get's into his windup. And have the kids that are on-deck do the same thing, timing and swinging at each pitch. Another trick I use is during BP is to postion yourself 10-15 feet in front of the plate( I sit on a bucket or get on my knees) and "quickly" underhand pitch them wiffle balls or plastic golf balls. They wil have less time to pick the ball up. This should help bat speed and timing. Be prepared to take a ball or two right back at you. Good luck!!! -Coach_Brewer
  9. Coach_Brewer

    Getting Swing Back

    I have a couple of kids on my team with the same problem. What I do is, with them standing @ the plate put an extra bat or 2x4 behind their heels, so when they step out they step on the bat ,or board and lose balance a bit. It seems to work good and no one has got hurt yet from falling on the bat. Good luck -Coach_Brewer
  10. Coach_Brewer

    Getting Swing Back

    One thing I noticed with my team is they dont "load" their hands back soon enough. They wait unitl the pitcher thows before loading. Try having him load his hands as soon as the pitcher get's into his windup. I know this helped for my team. Good luck and he will get it! -Coach_Brewer
  11. Coach_Brewer

    Help Being A New Coach

    Tim I agree with the coaches meeting, I would call one before the first practice just to introduce yourself to them. You should also give them a copy of the rules for the league. Let them know your expectations of their child for example... 1. Rule #1 is to have fun. 2. You should expect every kid to pay attention to you when you are teaching them new drills or instuctions (like double plays etc etc) 3. Give them your background. Dont be afariad of telling them this is your first year coaching 4. No name calling/ fighting among players. Let them know if you hear it that it will not be tolerated on your team. 5. If you don't have a assistant coach ask for volunteers to help in practice and games. Keep them busy in practice. Break them up into smaller groups 4-5 per group and work on diffrent drills. That is where help from the parents comes in handy. You dont want the kids to get bored. I have a great practice document if you would like it. This doc is geared more twords younger kids, t-ball and rookie, but works good for older kids too. I hope this along with the suggestions from the other coaches helps you out and best of luck on the upcoming season!!! -john
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