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4-5 Year Old 5 On 5 Flag Football Plays And Drills

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Freinds:

I am coaching my son's 4-5 year old flag football team. It will be the first year for all of them and my first year coaching. I have plenty of ideas for drills and plays when they are older and able to understand more concepts but I am at a loss for youth flag football drills and a limited youth flag playbook for them at this age. To save me from re-inventing the wheel, can someone share with me some drills and a playbook to use? I would really appreciate it. Thank you.

Dave Farris

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I didn't start my son until he was 7. In my opinion football at the age of 4-5 will not much resemble football. Play fun games and try to make it fun.

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Orange is right on the money. This is a great opportunity for you to create a love for the game for these little guys. Do a lot of flag pulling drills, practice handoffs and run run run. Keep it simple, get everyone touches and let these guys have fun so that they will want to keep playing.

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Herding cats 101. You will have an interesting challenge. Keep the expectations pretty low, the drills/plays simple and as everyone else has already stated have FUN.

Drills: Having kids standing in lines waiting - probably not a good idea. Drills that involve movement and ball touches while covering the basics - probably a good thing. I'd try and incorporate lots of games in your practices. You'll need to keep the practice moving to avoid chaos.

1) One or two kids in the middle of field, rest try to get through without getting their flag pulled. When flags are pulled they join the rest of the kids in middle to help pull flags.

2) Pair up kids, short distance apart and see how many throws/catches they can make without dropping the ball.

3) Don't look down drill. Short alleyway with 3 defenders spaced behind each other. Carrier coming through running hard and not looking down when someone tries to pull flag. Celebrate not looking down at flag but running straight ahead towards the________ fill-in-the-blank PS3, XBox, Pizza, etc...

4) Maybe have stations for drills so you have more coach to kid ratio.

Allow a decent amount of time for scrimmages. Best way to learn.

There are other drills that act more like games than drills but still teach skills.

Plays: Longer passes = no bueno. Passes in general will be tough, so make them really short (Center drag with QB following along los). Any misdirection you can pull off at this age will probably result in huge gains. Teach your kids to be good actors when faking.

After practice and before games, have all the parents/kids get together and hands in middle. Come up with some goofy cheer. With the parents in involved, the cheer is louder and creates more energy. "When I say ____ you say ____" or something like that.

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Herding cats 101. You will have an interesting challenge. Keep the expectations pretty low, the drills/plays simple and as everyone else has already stated have FUN.

Drills: Having kids standing in lines waiting - probably not a good idea. Drills that involve movement and ball touches while covering the basics - probably a good thing. I'd try and incorporate lots of games in your practices. You'll need to keep the practice moving to avoid chaos.

1) One or two kids in the middle of field, rest try to get through without getting their flag pulled. When flags are pulled they join the rest of the kids in middle to help pull flags.

2) Pair up kids, short distance apart and see how many throws/catches they can make without dropping the ball.

3) Don't look down drill. Short alleyway with 3 defenders spaced behind each other. Carrier coming through running hard and not looking down when someone tries to pull flag. Celebrate not looking down at flag but running straight ahead towards the________ fill-in-the-blank PS3, XBox, Pizza, etc...

4) Maybe have stations for drills so you have more coach to kid ratio.

Allow a decent amount of time for scrimmages. Best way to learn.

There are other drills that act more like games than drills but still teach skills.

Plays: Longer passes = no bueno. Passes in general will be tough, so make them really short (Center drag with QB following along los). Any misdirection you can pull off at this age will probably result in huge gains. Teach your kids to be good actors when faking.

After practice and before games, have all the parents/kids get together and hands in middle. Come up with some goofy cheer. With the parents in involved, the cheer is louder and creates more energy. "When I say ____ you say ____" or something like that.

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