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Favorite Play(S)?

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I'm asking this because of a conversation with the coach we beat last week. He admitted to me that he had two favorite plays, and told me he was probably forcing them more often than he should've because we kept shutting it down. He asked about any particular plays I love to run, and three came to mind, which I told him about.

I'm sharing one here, might put the others on later, but don't want to just ramble. This play is designed for 8 on 8, blitz option once every set of downs, otherwise 5 count to rush the passer. Or can rush if the QB leaves the pocket, or if the ball is handed off.

Twins Right Left Tight Double Slant "Eyes Wide"

It's called "Eyes Wide" because it's designed for beating a defense that puts 5 defenders on the line in the box, and has man to man coverage on the receivers (usually 1 step off the line). "Eyes Wide" is short for isolation wide.

Formation - we have the left receiver (#1) in the slot, offensive line/ends (#'s 2 & 4) tight to the right and left of the center (#3), right receiver (#5) out wide, a back/receiver (#8) stands one step behind and to the inside of the right receiver, and a running back (#7) behind the QB (#6), who is under center.

I usually run this play after the opponent has blitzed (usually 2nd down), but sometimes run it on first down due to the overwhelming number of first down rushes in this league.

Routes:

#1 - Slot Receiver - shallow slant

#2 - Left End/Lineman - deep out

#3 - Center - short middle

#4 - Right End/Lineman - quick/short out

#5 - Right Receiver - deep slant

#7 - Running Back - play fake to rush, then quick out

#8 - 2nd Receiver Right - out & up

At the snap the QB fakes the handoff to the running back (#7). The slot receiver (#1) runs a shallow slant pattern, the right receiver (#5) runs a deep slant. The ends each run outs, #2 (left center) runs a deep out, #4 (right of center) runs a quick/short out. #8, out behind/beside #5, runs an out & up (aka, "chair" some call it). After his fake rush, the running back runs a short out to the left. The center (#3) waits until at least the defense is at "3" before going upfield 2-3 years for a quick dump-off.

The normal progression for the quarterback is to NOT look first at any receiver, but at the middle safety. If he drops back to cover the deep slant (#5), the first target is the slot receiver coming across. Therefore progression goes as follows: #5 (deep slant), #1 (slot receiver), #8 (deep out and up), #4 (quick out), then turning across the field to look at #2 (deep out) and then #7 (back running an out) for the dumpoff. The center is the emergency pass, and I'm very clear to him about his job, that being to get open, if necessary get open by "posting up" the defender like he would in basketball - ie, get his butt into the defender's gut to give the QB a safe pass.

The best part of this play is the ability to pass to multiple receivers, or even use it to run the ball (then #'s 2, 3, 4 block on the line, #1 (slot) comes across to see the end of the line with a block). I've used this play to set up the defense, by going to the slot receiver, or to #4 on the quick out several times, to draw the defense up. Then after 2-3 passes, go to the deep slant (#5) or the out & up (#8) after a pump short.

This is why I'm very strong coaching the QB with this play, to be patient and to throw sharp passes to the short receivers, it can't float in there. We've been countered by the defense dropping some of their linemen back, but so far it's done pretty well for us.

Anyone else have a play they'd like to share?

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Okay, so I was going to put down my other play that I love to use, and has been very effective for me. The same scenario as above in regards to the blitzing, rushing, 5 on the los, etc.

The only exception to the above is that as with the previous play I have used this with 8-9 year olds, who absolutely LOVE it.

Right Receiver Offset Reverse QB Roll Right "Ghost"

Formation - Left receiver (#1) is wide, One back (#7) in the slot left, left end (#2), center (#3), right end (#4), right wide receiver (#5) set wide off the los, QB (#6) under center, one back (#8) set to the right of the QB.

Before the snap, #5 (left wr) comes in motion - running - toward the qb. QB gets the snap before the WR gets there, turns with his back to the defense and fakes the handoff to the WR. At the snap, the back (#8) runs out into the flat, toward the sideline. #'s 7, 2, 3, 4 all set picks as if for a run to the WR. They hold the picks for about a second, then get into their routes.

#1 - Deep slant right

#7 - Deep in/cross

#2 - Deep slant right

#3 - Short middle

#4 - Quick out

#5 - Run left, then step back as emergency pass

#8 - Run right, run down sideline looking for pass

After the handoff - and here is the key - the QB keeps his back to the defense, but he is WATCHING THE WR. This is crucially important. But turning to watch the WR on the fake, it convinces the defense that the WR has the ball. Anyway, so he looks for about a second to watch the WR fake, then rolls right. Once he moves, he'll have the option to run, but so far we've run this play about 15 times, every time for positive yards. In all those times, only 2 runs - once handing off to the WR (in which case #1 & #7 seal the edge to give the WR the outside) and once the QB kept it for a touchdown run nearly the length of the field.

I tell the QB to NOT look at the RB (#8) when he starts to roll out. Instead, he is to look at the defenders. If the safety (deep defender) on the right commits, he knows he can hit the deep man if he is patient. He also needs to check the cornerback on the right, to see if he is coming hard. That's why #4 is doing a quick out, it's an easy dumpoff.

There are alot of alternative routes in this play as well. The best one I've found is if the left receiver is told to run a 5-6 yard out pattern. By the time he hits 5 yards, the defense is committing to the WR reverse. The QB only needs to turn and let it fly for the out, and it's big yardage almost every time. Again, the QB needs to check the safety and the corner on that side before throwing.

Another option is to have the left WR do a deep left slant or a quick crossing pattern rather than the play fake. In other words, the QB snaps it earlier, and the WR goes downfield instead of coming straight across the field behind the QB.

I like this play because of all the different options that the QB has at his disposal. It is also an easy play for the QB to read his options. His reads go as follows: look to pass to #8 first, #2 on the deep slant, #7 - finish up with #4. But if he looks deep and the safeties are staying deep, he knows he has to look short to #4 or run the ball.

Oh, as with the first play, be careful about running this if the defense can blitz. The QB will have his back to the defense for about 2 seconds, that's alot of time.

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Our top two plays is our bootleg and our RB fake reverse. Both are set up by prior plays.

1. For our bootleg, we first give it to a WR on an end-around, then the next play we execute the fake and the QB rolls out. These are always our first two plays. Ironically, we scored on the bootleg (our second play) in--I think--eight of our 10 games last season--I don't recall. We also scored on it in our only game this season. It's become somewhat of a point of interest on my team, as all my parents know what we are going to do the first two plays, and it's incredible how we keep scoring on that play. We might score two or three more TDs the rest of the game, but this has been money for us.

2. The RB fake is pretty simple. Two-back formation. We pitch it to RB1 who reverses it to RB2. The next play, we pitch it to RB1, who fakes the reverse to RB2, and 90% of time RB1 has no one around him. We also scored with this in our last game, and the opposing coach was (correctly) telling his kids to watch the fake reverse, but they either didn't listen or didn't believe him because it worked out to perfection.

I personally think it's hard to give defensive players instructions "one the fly" especially 8-9 year olds. If I were to ever instruct them to do something just before a play (i.e. "watch the fake"), then you can bet it's something we've gone over in detail and walked through in practice.

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Our top two plays is our bootleg and our RB fake reverse. Both are set up by prior plays.

1. For our bootleg, we first give it to a WR on an end-around, then the next play we execute the fake and the QB rolls out. These are always our first two plays. Ironically, we scored on the bootleg (our second play) in--I think--eight of our 10 games last season--I don't recall. We also scored on it in our only game this season. It's become somewhat of a point of interest on my team, as all my parents know what we are going to do the first two plays, and it's incredible how we keep scoring on that play. We might score two or three more TDs the rest of the game, but this has been money for us.

2. The RB fake is pretty simple. Two-back formation. We pitch it to RB1 who reverses it to RB2. The next play, we pitch it to RB1, who fakes the reverse to RB2, and 90% of time RB1 has no one around him. We also scored with this in our last game, and the opposing coach was (correctly) telling his kids to watch the fake reverse, but they either didn't listen or didn't believe him because it worked out to perfection.

I personally think it's hard to give defensive players instructions "one the fly" especially 8-9 year olds. If I were to ever instruct them to do something just before a play (i.e. "watch the fake"), then you can bet it's something we've gone over in detail and walked through in practice.

I agree, it's all but impossible to instruct kids on the fly. With my kids, we work hard on the defense. Playing 8 on 8, we put a cornerback wide, a boy over the center, and two defensive ends who set up just outside the offensive ends. We don't play man to man, we play zone. Usually the defensive center (nose tackle just seems the wrong title!) drops back almost like a linebacker, but the corners stay at home and don't drop back. RB runs wide right or left, and the cornerback isn't supposed to get the flag - their only job is to "slam the side door", as I call it, in other words they don't let the rb get around them. It was hard at first to get them to stay at home on defense, but now that they've picked up on it, they're shutting down opponents left and right.

I will admit that it's not just the coaching - this is a talented team, with a high collective football I.Q. They make the coaching staff look good!

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we play 5 on 5 our two favorite plays our mush and wildcat.

Our mush play we have my runningback and my tallest reciever on the field bunch up next to each other on the right side of the center and my quick reciver about 4 yards away to the left and they all go at the same time my runningback takes 1 step and goes in left torwards the sidelines my tall reciver runs to the blitz cone that we have a turns around. My quick receiver who is on the left side take 3 steps and runs across and gets to the back of the endzone on the right side and my center who is open every single time takes a step back and runs right towards the fron of the endzone and and usally the diffence never see's him because of all the crossing patters going on

Wildcat we have the center and qb the runningback is lined up behind the qb i have a reciver about 5 yards away from the runningback on his right side and have another reciever spread out to the right our first plays it the qb pitches the ball back to the rb who hands it off to the reciever and he eithr hits the right reciver on a fly or the center on the our or takes off and runs the other play is where the runningback fakes it and he either throws it back to the qb or takes off and runs we either get touchdowns or long runs everytime we do this play

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Wildcat we have the center and qb the runningback is lined up behind the qb i have a reciver about 5 yards away from the runningback on his right side and have another reciever spread out to the right our first plays it the qb pitches the ball back to the rb who hands it off to the reciever and he eithr hits the right reciver on a fly or the center on the our or takes off and runs the other play is where the runningback fakes it and he either throws it back to the qb or takes off and runs we either get touchdowns or long runs everytime we do this play

My teams play 8 on 8, but we have a play that's pretty close to that called "44". We line up one receiver wide right, two receivers wide left, standard three on the los, and a back offset to the left. At the snap the QB immediately runs right. He hands off to the right receiver running left for the WR reverse. The QB slows down for a few steps after the handoff, then runs down the sideline. The running back does a jabstep left, then runs right to take the double reverse handoff. The left receivers do a quick crossing pattern (outside receiver) and a deep crossing pattern (inside receiver), and the right end on the line does a quick out right. If it works the back will have the QB down the sideline wide open, a good run option maybe one on one, as well as three crossing patterns.

We call it 44 (it's actually play 35!) because the first time we practiced it one of the players kept laughing about it, pretending to be a defender and calling out "reverse! *cough* reverse! *cough*" and I just thought it was funny. So the cough led to Vicks 44, and finally just 44!

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