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Passing Drill For Qb With Interception Issues

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I need some advice and a drill on how to teach a QB to not throw into a swarm of defenders.

My QB a HUGE arm and is very accurate...problem? I simply cannot seem to get this player to look at where he is throwing and make sure his passing assignment is actually open. There can literally be 3 defensive players on his assignment and I just can't seem to get him to explore alternative options.

What can I do? Has anyone had a similar issue and how did you overcome it? Is there a proven drill that I can use in practice to help him overcome this? BTW, there is a 5 second count and then anyone can rush. So we have 5 seconds to get the ball off which is usually plenty of time.

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Theres no drill needed for this.Get a new QB in there who can make better decisions.

I'm not trying to come off the wrong way but its pretty simple man.You dont have to have a kid with the best arm/accuracy in flag football to win.In fact I've had kids that cant even throw 10 yards in 11-13 year olds and went 10-0 and won the championship.

So you have to find someone who can make the right decisons.Either that or simple up the offense for the kid if you wont change the QB.But remember your the coach and he needs to be doing what you ask of him.Just like any other player.If the kid cant do that then he probably shouldnt be playing QB.

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Three things I can think of, but only one is a drill:

1. If your plays are like mine, you have a go-to receiver. I have played with 3-4 boys since they were five, now they're eight. When they were younger, it was go-to receiver no matter what. That's how the plays are designed. So we will get ints because of poor play design. The QB will force it bc the hot receiver is supposed to be open. Doesn't always work like I drew it up on PPT. I'm trying to unlearn these plays now and talk about 2nd and 3rd receivers.

2. Teach the QB to get the snap from center with their head up. Don't look under the center's butt for the ball. This will start the motion of the play with QB's eyes up. He can read the defense and adjust.

3. The drill. Pretty simple. I have two receivers and one corner. Start the play from under center as normal. I only let the WRs go to half of the field and 15 yards deep at the most. Usually a cross pattern. They have five seconds to get open and QB must pick the right guy. Helps QB, WR and corners too. Pretty effective drill usually.

Coach Fun

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I agree with "Coach Fun" that having a primary (and even a secondary) receiver on each play will really help. Other than that...it just takes experience at the position. Years ago when my son started playing QB, he threw tons of INTs. Now, I think he's only thrown one in the past three seasons (I know he had none last season, one the season before, and I think none the season prior to that). FWIW, what helped with me was to simply let him start making his own decisions. Back in the day I was on the field and would say, "Throw it now", etc. He told me it distracted him so I stopped. Additionally, another thing that helps is to tell your QB once he feels he can make the throw to make it. If he hesitates or bird-dogs, it will increase the probability of an INT.

Regarding switching him, that's a tricky one. Is he your only QB? If so, perhaps get a second one and split time? Or simplify the offense. Regardless, I'd think most players new to the position will have to go through growing pains and take their lumps throwing INTs. Good luck!

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I tend to agree with these assessments. I don't know that you can teach him the decision making skills. That comes with experience mainly and the ability to read the defense, etc. My first thought is to shorten up the passing routes and simplify things for the QB. Shorter passes to more limited targets would definitely help.

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Here are some tips that have work for our QB´s:

I instruct Qb´s that primary receiver ONLY means which guy the Qb turns his head at first, plain and simple so they don’t get caught up on the idea of throwing exclusively to that guy, on second term I instruct them to locks on this receiver for two seconds and if this receiver is not open then he scans the field, I don’t use the second or third receiver concept, It looks like they just get more confused.

One overlook quality in Qb which I prefer over strong throwing arm or the perfect throwing technique is avoidance & serenity, if Qb is not elusive he only has 2 or 3 secs at the most to throw, the shorter the throwing time the play doesn’t develop fully unless you design very short passing routs. If Qb freaks on the rush he tends to turns his eyes away from the receiver onto the rusher, this has to be avoided at all costs. And of course most important thing that other have mentioned, splitting defenses up is a mind thing, some are born with this “spontaneous math calculus” thing and some are not.

Another good tip is that Qb´s feet have to be always on the move, you don’t need anything fancy like Payton Manning, a slight bouncing up and down (ankle moving) is enough, this slight movement will give Qb better chance to move his body faster to the proper throwing position and making better and more accurate passes, but most importantly thing which usually is not mentioned is that feet and leg movement keeps brain activity up and running (this is the reason why some people move their legs a lot while they are sitting down).

As for drills the best thing you can do is have every once in a while a “no playbook game” among your guys, just split the guys in two teams and let them play freely with no pre-fabricated passing routs, receivers just go wild, run whatever they want to run and Qb is forced to scan and read since he doesn’t know where receivers are going. You can also have shootout of 2 receivers against one defender, set the receivers tight together so that 1 defender can cover both for the first couple of yards, you secretly instruct rout to each receiver and defender just goes as he reads and picks, so after 3 o 4 yard defender goes with one receiver leaving one open for the Qb to throw, simple, but is works, as time goes by you can add a rush with same mechanic’s and further on a 3-2 shootout.

I have seen that Qb tend to lock on one receiver since the design of the play is done that way, usually passing playbook instruct – “hey you fake to this side then you throw to that side or that guy”, but there is actually no scanning and decision making left to the Qb, it works fine on the younger guys but scanning and decision making is a must as they grow up.

I went throughout all of this since I played Qb for 8 years at tackle.

Hope it helps.

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