Jump to content
Y-coach.com - Forum
Sign in to follow this  
caneincgfl

How To Scrimmage At Practice?

Recommended Posts

My team is 7-9 year old 5 on 5 NFL flag. I would like to do some scrimmage time at practice, maybe at the end. I have 9 players so I was thinking of doing 3 on 3 and rotating 3 squads (2 squads play, 1 sits, then rotate offense out and sideline guys come in). I've seen some 3 man plays on this site but was wondering what dimension field to mark off, whether to have rushing, and generally what mechanics to use. I also hoped you guys had some other scrimmage ideas. What do you think?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think this is a good question, as very few of us luck into a count of players that allows us to divide the teams equally for intra-team scrimmage...and I'm curious what others do as well.

My focus goes on offense. We play 6v6. Assume we have 10 players. I will put six on offense, and four on defense. This is because my mindset when we scrimmage is ALL offense. In the past, I would rotate players on offense to defense. Example: We run a reverse. I would keep my C, QB, RB, MR in (i.e. those touching the ball or faking it) but put my RR, and LR on defense.

However, I noticed that it was a huge distraction to offensive chemistry, as even players who don't get the ball have a specific assignment to aid in the play--so now I only run plays with a full offense.

So I guess my advice would be five on offense, and four on defense. Of course---we often do a defensive "walk-thru scrimmage" which has really helped our defense. Essentially, I put in a full defense, and we walk through the anatomy of an offensive play. I'll stop at certain points and say "When you see a WR here, the RB here, and the QB doing x...then you do y". As we progress through the play, I'll position the offensive players in the field (they just stand there) and we work through it "If you (LB) see one WR in the flat and one in the seam, then you cover the seam to a certain point and let him (S) take him once he gets to this point...and then you (CB) keep roll to the flat and keep the WR in the flat in front of you", etc. etc. Then we might do that in real-time, but the intent is to stop a play and let them see what is around them so they know how to react based on specific situations.

I am the first to admit I throw a LOT at my players. However, as long as they absorb it, I keep throwing. One thing I started doing a few seasons ago that really helped them retain things is at the end of every practice we stand and I ask each player what he learned at that practice. "Joey" might have forgotten what he learned when practice is over, but when he is forced to recall it--that seems to help place it in his long-term memory.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd play 5 on 5. Either you or one of the assistant coaches steps in an plays one of the positions. Maybe rush or play one of the decoy receivers. Or grab one of the players brothers or sisters to stand in, there is usually some kids hanging around ball fields.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Echoing what John and Orange just said, if we have to go unbalanced, I always try to scrimmage with a full 5 person offense. I'm always hammering the players and parents that every player has an important role in our success, and it's just weird to try to run certain plays without a WR occupying a safety or the C not making a lead or backside block.

If I can, I recruit a brother or a dad to step in. I've even been able to convince a few big sisters to join in from time to time. Both turned out to be *very* motivated to play defense against their little brothers...go figure. :)

In a way, it's even better if the green recruits don't know your plays or even your defensive points of emphasis. It gives your O a great chance to succeed as long as they execute properly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd do both 3 v 3 and 5 v 4 (add brother, coach on 4 team like Orange said).

I really like 3 v 3/Cutthroat though. I started doing that a few seasons back and the kids love it. Dimensions of the field aren't extremely important, make it wide enough to run decent pass routes.

Rules:

Team on offense has to make it past 10 yd marker to stay on offense.

Defense must send at least one rusher, can send two or all three if they want.

If offense makes it past 10 yd marker, they stay on O, new team comes in from sideline as D.

If offense fails to make it 10 yds, current D becomes O, sideline team is new D.

No waiting for new D to setup, they must be ready to rock coming in from sideline.

Why I like it?

-it allows everyone a shot at "making a play"

-it allows everyone to play QB

-everyone plays center

-more ball touches for everyone

-they learn the basic routes

-it moves fast

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...