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Guest Peter

Qualities of a Good Coach

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Guest Lisa

In my personal opnion I would have to say this,

A good coach teaches good sportsmanship.

A good coach will respect all of his/her players and teach them how to respect each other.

A good coach will take extra time with those who need it.

A good coach will find the best in each player.

A good coach will teach his players how to be a team.

A good coach will have patience.

A good coach will remember it’s a game whether they win or lose.

skivue99@yahoo.com

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Guest Doug G

Peter,

I agree with all of the qualities outlined in Lisa's post. I also think

the following qualities are important.

  • A good coach doesn't get caught up in the outcome of the game but keeps their focus on
  • A good coach continually stives to become better by seeking advise and training.
  • A good coach thinks and acts positively not negatively.
  • A good coach understands that adversity is a part of the game and life.
  • A good coach is prepared and doesn't just show up.
  • A good coach honors the game by showing respect for the rules, opponents, officials and players.
  • A good coach always thanks their players for their committment and effort.
  • A good coach recognizes that they are the leader of the team. This not only includes players but

Thanks for the forum!

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A good coach is:

A shoe lace tie-r (no matter how old they get!)

A tear wiper (also no matter how old they get)

As loyal as the family dog( no matter how BAD they are)

A firm hand in a soft glove (for both holding and "pushing')

The one who will cross that "line in the sand" to stick up for you.

A teacher and a "learner"

And 7....yes I do ramble....A coach is the one person in a kids life that WILL make a difference. Know it. Believe it. You probably will never know it, but there will be at least one child who will be forever influenced by your actions and demeanor. Make sure it's positive. (NO MATTER HOW OLD THEY GET !!!!)

:D

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A good coach ....... never lose. :P

(I could explane this)

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A good coach is always focussed on learning goals, and not on winning te next game or getting champion.

When a coach is focussed on setting learning goals, in learning technique, he or she and the team are able to lose a game but in the same time reaching the goals they set for this game. On the other hand when a team lose the game or didn't becom champion, this doesn't mean they didn't learn something.

I always say to my kids: "when we want to get champion, we have a problem. There are a lot other teams who want to be champion too". When we didn't becom champion this doesn't that we can play a great season.

This is what I mean by the words 'a good coach never lose'.

A good coach is some one who is able to set the right goals for the team and every individual kid in the team.

Bert

..... by the way, there is not so much activity in this forum.

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"Can anyone give me six qualities of a good coach?"

Just curious, but why six?

An old saying goes, Anybody can teach Xs and Os, but a great coach inspires. That should be number one on any list.

Caring is important. You cannot lead a team if you don't care about them. Not about their play, but about them as people.

Not caring too much. If you care more about winning the game than they do, perhaps you need to revisit your priorities. (I once witnessed a coach screaming at his crying third graders, "I WANT THIS GAME!" It was shameful.)

Know the game. Simply put, you cannot teach that which you do not know.

Preparation. A modestly intelligent coach with a plan is vastly superior to an intelligent coach with no plan. The first coach may cram as much teaching into one practice as the second teaches in four. Preparation is the key.

Thick skin. Parents will argue with you, refs won’t see things your way, and you can never please everyone. You need to accept this from Day One. As the saying goes, If you can’t take the heat, then get out of the kitchen.

IMHO.

Kenny

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1. Takes care of his players welfare & safety while under his supervision. Cares for them like each one is his own child.

2. Uses the game (temporary) to teach life lessons (permanent). Things like dealing with adversity (losing), understanding the connection between effort and results, doing what's right even when no one is watching, realizing mistakes are ok but what matters is what you do after the mistake.

3. Doesn't just run a drill (go thru the motions), but actually uses drills to teach the fundamental skills that make players good, and make plays work.

4. Seeks to empower his players by creating a team dynamic where the players take ownership of the team and make it their team, not the coaches team (completely do-able at the varsity level & less so as age goes down).

5. Is a great communicator- never a chamelion, has a plan that he makes clear and sticks to it, but can change if necessary. Communicates well with kids and their parents. Says what he's going to do and then does it.

6. Makes practicing and playing fun! That doesn't mean easy.

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1. Disipline

2.Character

3.Integrity

4.Knowlege

5.Love of what he does/Passion

6.Comitment.

These are only 6 there are many more but I will say this when dealing with youth the No 1 duty of a coach is to see to it that every player in his or her program has a POSITIVE EXPERIANCE in that season.

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1. Disipline

2.Character

3.Integrity

4.Knowlege

5.Love of what he does/Passion

6.Comitment.

These are only 6 there are many more but I will say this when dealing with youth the No 1 duty of a coach is to see to it that every player in his or her program has a POSITIVE EXPERIANCE in that season.

Hi there, I agree with your points but just wanted to add enthusiasm into the mix. There is a useful article on what makes a good soccer coach and I'm including a bit of the article here for info. Click the link to see the rest of the article. http://www.bettersoccercoaching.com/Article-43-20-Coaching-Skills-and-tips-for-successful-youth-soccer-coaching

The art of coaching youth soccer requires one thing in abundance... enthusiasm. It's your most important quality. Kids will respond to you if you're an eager, hard working leader. Some kids find learning boring, some don't care about winning, and some can't remember which goal they're kicking towards. But what unites them is the desire to have fun and play a game. This is our blueprint for successful soccer coaching.

Think first

Think about why you want to be a soccer coach and what you want to achieve from your soccer coaching drills and training sessions. Gain trust and respect. You are a role model with responsibility to your team. If you set high standards for the drills, the children will follow. Be enthusiastic and make your soccer drills fun.

Praise not criticism

Be patient with your kids, you get more out of them if you praise their efforts and hard work rather than criticise. Body language is important. Smiles and positive gestures will reap rewards. Shouting will not help you keep control and many parents watching may not like it. Be consistent, set achievable goals and give lots of feedback.

Get the knowledge

If you understand the skills and techniques involved in what you are trying to teach, you will be better equipped to pass this on. Try out the soccer drills yourself, are they too hard, too easy? Demonstrating how skills and drills work is better than using words. If you can’t do a particular skill, use one of your helpers who can.

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Giving positive feedback to help players progress is a good quality. One way to give feedback is by doing player evaluations. In sports you must teach the athletes technique, skill, etiquette, sportsmanship, and knowledge. An evaluation can help get your point across. http://www.zoomreports.com/

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Six? Ok, I'll give three for now...

1. I am a person that will be watched. I am concious that I am an example of what a coach IS (to the players, families, referees, other coaches, league officials and spectators); my actions, words and attitude will be judged as per their perspective and their judgement will be true to them, whether I like it or not.

2. I am a person thats been entrusted. I am concious that the players, parents and league officials are watching to see if I am doning my best to bring out the best athleticsm in the players and team while at the same time displaying a posture that others would feel honored to share.

3. I am a servant to parents. I am concious that I have been guided to this position by a passion that was given to me and I must steward this passion with ownership yet giving honor to the position that I have been placed in. This position carries with it a responsibility to serve people that have brought children into this world and they have chosen me to be an extension of themselves to train their children in a particular life expression, that expression is this sport at this time.

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