Jump to content


Coaching Youth Fooball - Football Plays
Photo

Glove Arm When Pitching


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 DougO

DougO

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 21 January 2004 - 11:25 AM

Would like to get some thoughts and opinions on the glove arm. I have been telling my daughter to bring her Glove arm straight down and close to her body rather than throwing or letting herr arm go out to the side away from the line of force. Am I off base on this, and does it have a negative affect on how hard she can throw if she keeps her arm tight?

TeamSnap!

#2 Charlie

Charlie

    MVP

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 91 posts

Posted 26 January 2004 - 10:16 AM

DougO,

I am no expert by any means, but in my opinion it is correct to point the glove at the target and pull it down and straight back towards the pitcher.

Charlie

#3 synwave7

synwave7

    MVP

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 53 posts

Posted 04 February 2004 - 03:51 PM

DougO,
I coach baseball and if you were asking about baseball I could help out with mechanics. I can offer however this url I found simply by typing in Softball Pitchers in the Yahoo search engine, Google may offer back more. Anyway, here you go, hope this helps.

http://store.coaches...com/comtob.html

Syn

#4 star_blaster

star_blaster

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 04 February 2004 - 07:37 PM

Hi Doug

I have my daughter raise her glove and pitching hand above her head (and separating them) when she steps with her left foot.
She then sites down her upper arm using her elbow as her sight (as oppsed to extending the left hand and sighting with the glove).
As she releases the ball and drags the pivot foot she sharply pulls her glove in to her left side with the wrist up.
This is similar to a Karate punch where the punching arm is extended with the wrist down and simultaneously the non-punching arm is brought back againt the hip or rib area with the wrist oriented up toward the sky.
This counter-balances the physical force generated by the throwing arm while allowing the pitcher to achieve a defensive stance, ready to field a ball hit in her direction.

#5 hollad6636

hollad6636

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 395 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:San Antonio, TX

Posted 05 February 2004 - 09:19 AM

DougO,

We have added a whole line of fastpitch videos to our online store. All of the videos are by Coach Ernie Parker.

Coach Parker is one of the premier fastpitch coaches in the United States. He has been coaching for over 30 years and has produced 9 ASA National Champion pitchers and sent 29 students to the D1 college level, including DeeDee Weiman, Carrie Dolan and Lisa Fernandez.

If any of you have worked with Coach Ernie I am sure you will agree and I would love to have your feedback.

If you are looking for good information on sound fundamentals and techniques you can't go wrong with Coach Parker.

To check out the line-up of videos that we offer just go to our online store.

Regards,

Schann Holladay
y-coach.com

#6 Charlie

Charlie

    MVP

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 91 posts

Posted 09 February 2004 - 12:40 PM

I actually own a copy of The Basics and Fundamentals for the Windmill Pitcher, The Drills Video's and Learning the Fundamentals of the Killer Rise by Coach Parker and I would recommend any Ernie Parker video to anyone interested in coaching pitchers.

Coach Parker does an excellent job of breaking down the various techniques including the different grips for the various pitches.

Charlie

#7 pertulie

pertulie

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 23 May 2004 - 10:03 AM

The major reason the glove arm is extended toward the plate is to get the shoulders aligned with the hips. This point is done very quickly.

My prefrence is to is to pull the glove back to my left collar bone as the pitch is thrown thus keeping the shoulder alignment. This is for the right handed pitcher.

It has been my pleasure to teach several good pitchers that chose a lower follow through.