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Offensive Line Tips For Youth Football


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#1 hollad6636

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 09:11 AM


Here are 4 quick tips to improve your youth football teams offensive line play:


"Who" to block is as or more important than "How" to block for most youth football teams.

Even the greatest block on the wrong player can result in football plays that go for losses.


On the other hand, many times even a poorly executed block on the right player can impede the defender long enough for your team to get a descent gain out of the play.


Some things to consider:


1) In order for your team to effectively block the right player on each play, you must have a simple and sound blocking scheme and rules. Our blocking rule on most plays is GOD, inside gap, "on", unconditional down. The player looks to the inside gap first, if no one is there, they look to "on". if no one is there, they move to an unconditional down block.

2) You must teach the scheme to the players in a fashion they can understand it and where it becomes second nature to them. We do lots of first two step and freeze drills. Also assign our best coach to the offensive line.


3) Your offense must take the time during practice to make sure that every play is run perfectly. Make sure the correct player is being blocked every play and with proper first steps and head placement using methods like "birddogging" and fit and freezing. These methods include the offensive line taking steps on your count 1-2-3-4 and "fitting" on the defender he is to block. This is a slow motion drill, not live scrimmaging.


4) Technique is important too, but "Who" to block is often the most neglected area with most youth football teams.

More interesting youth football topics at Winning Youth Football.




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#2 Coach Dennis S

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Posted 15 June 2012 - 10:08 PM

Coach, I am curious about how you would handle a certain blocking situation? A simple technique I have used, and I have seen used, regardless of defensive formation, is to line up a DT in the 1 gap and the 2 gap. Against the G.O.D. blocking scheme it allowed the defense to take up three blockers on two defenders. The thought is to outnumber the offense. 11 O players - 3 blockers - 1 RB = 7 vs 9 = 2 gap DTs - 11 D players.

Would you adjust in any way if a defense was lining up this way?

#3 k564s

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 02:43 AM

Since I don't see a reply from the original poster, I will take a crack at this. First of all, I coach the O line on a team that has 8-11 YOA at the beginning of the season. Our RBs tend to be the smaller, quicker, boys (sometimes giving up as much as 70 LBS to the heavier kids). I teach the GOD scheme but the D means "down to the play side". So in our scheme if the hole is an even number, the third read "D" is to the right. The center (who MUST be a stud) runs a "POD" rule meaning Play side, On, Down rule. We only account for defenders that are within about 3 yard of the Line Of Scrimmage (LOS) at the snap. If someone lines up as you describe with the tackles in the "A" gap, we tend to run, by scheme, toward the double team. So the Center would block on the same defender as the play side guard. This, against traditional defenses, has yeilded over 3 yards per carry average when running inside. Your extra player (or two) tends to be back side and must read and react to be in on the tackle. The only scheme that seems to really mess us up is any variation of the double A gap blitz. Just for disclosure, I took over the D this year and I run alot of double A and X blitzes in the A gaps. With the double A or X blitz, there are just too many bodies inside for the O line to block. The QB sneak works well against this blitz, however.

So, the simple answer is, if you were just putting tackles in the 1 and 2 gaps (or A gaps for our D) we would end up with a double team on the play side and that SHOULD allow us to run effectively. Blitz double A gaps and you could confuse our O-line.

Good luck and I wish you the best for your season.

#4 RoyalFlush18

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 03:33 PM

A simple technique I have used, and I have seen used, regardless of defensive formation, is to line up a DT in the 1 gap and the 2 gap. Against the G.O.D. blocking scheme it allowed the defense to take up three blockers on two defenders.

Would you adjust in any way if a defense was lining up this way?


Double Teams along the OL are a good thing. GOD is generally associated with the Single Wing and the Double WIng Offenses. In these Offenses the QB is primarly a runner or in the DW a blocker.

If you are running OT, there is no need to block the backside DE or the backside CB. The Offense is actually playing 10 blockers vs 9 Defenders.

Vs a 60 Front - OT
................................S

........................B........B...........................
C.............................................................C
..............E.....1....2..3. 4..........E
..................E.G.C.G.T.T.E
...............................B........W
........................Q.F....................

LE(D = Down) and LG (O) have Double on "1".
C - Steps Playside blocks "2"
RG - Pulls through OT hole, looks inside for 1st threat
RT - (G = Inside Gap) blocks 3
PT - (O = ON) and RE (D = DOWN) double 4.

B - Kicks the playside DE
W - FBI - First Backer Inside
F - Leads through OT hole looks outside to CB
Q - Gets his butt through the OT hole quickly preventing backside DE from chasing him down.

When exectuted should yield 5 Yards. With Double Team blocks you are not looking for a stalemate but to move the DL to 2nd level into the laps of the LB making it hard to flow. Once the D adjusts, you counter or sweep to the outside.

#5 Coach Marty

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 09:36 AM

Thank you all for the info guys. I've been coaching flag and baseball for years but his is my first year with Youth football and they tabbed me as "Off. Co". The title is funny to me because it's 2nd grade through 4th. Anyway, I'm having a very difficult time getting my line to block....ANYONE! Its killing me. I've got 2 kids that can block on the line and a third that gives it his best. My solid two are at C and right G (who pulls like a machine by the way). My good effort kid is at right T. My entire left side and both ends seem to stand up with their hands out in front of them and hope for the best. I've tried the "rope drill" where its a reverse limbo. Snap, step forward and low to get under the rope with hands up. Take the rope away and they go back to the bad habits. I have three solid and talented RB's but they are getting hit as they get the handoff. My QB has sometimes been getting hit as he's handing it off!! Someone is going to get hurt if I don't get some blocking.

Didn't know about the GOD rule. I'll give that a shot.

My problem is motivation. Not sure how to get them to give me some more effort. I don't want to yell and I don't want to spend my practice having them run laps. I'm open to any suggestions since we have 4 games left in the season.

PS

We usually run a wing back offense and on occasion mix it up with a power I.

Thanks again

#6 RoyalFlush18

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 02:59 PM


My problem is motivation. Not sure how to get them to give me some more effort. I don't want to yell and I don't want to spend my practice having them run laps. I'm open to any suggestions since we have 4 games left in the season.


You must have a blocking rule for them to follow. Knowing who to block and blocking the correct man is more important than how well they block. Removing doubt about assignments allows them to be more aggressive.

Do you film? If not ask your parents to film the game for you.

Do you teach hands or shoulder blocking? I went to shoulder blocking this year as opposed to hands (I have the same ages). The reason why isn't that I think a shoulder block is superior to a hands block (whole other debate). What I found with hands blocking was for a lot of the kids at this age it turned into a "chicken fight". Shoulder blocking demands that they put a "body on a body".

Keys
  • Quick 1st 2 Steps, man who gets his 2nd Step down first has the advantage.
  • I'd tell you to have them stay low but the truth is a lot of them play high at this age, when they do the stronger ones always win.
  • Stress to keep the feet moving, wide base. DRIVE, DRIVE, DRIVE.
  • During drills excessivley praise the effort/technique you are looking for when you see it.
  • You can also teach a CRAB/SHOESHINE block.
What you can do with 4 weeks left. Yelling doesn't do anything at this age (or most ages for that matter).

Rep them everyday. Teach them to HIT...not block. Blocking isn't fun, hitting is.

Bag Work with emphsis on 1st 2 steps.
Board Drills 1 on 1 - push your man out of the circle.
Oklahoma type drills.

#7 Coach Marty

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 10:32 PM

Thanks Royal,

I agree about the yelling. Caught myself doing it a couple of times and I've focused on not doing it again.

I like the idea of shoulder blocking and the two step drills. I've also introduced GOD but its a slow process and only a few are getting it so far. Uphill battle but I'm on it.