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Developing Coordination - Part One


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#1 DevelopingAthletics

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Posted 20 July 2004 - 02:57 PM

Coordination & Movement Skill Development
The Key To Long-Term Athletic Success
Part One

By Brian J. Grasso

The key ingredient to working with pre-adolescent and early adolescent athletes is providing global stimulation from a movement perspective. Younger athletes must experience and eventually perfect, a variety of motor skills in order to ensure both future athletic success and injury prevention. Developing basic coordination through movement stimulus is a must, with the eventual goal of developing sport-specific coordination in the teenage years. Coordination itself however, is a global system made up of several synergistic elements and not necessarily a singularly defined ability.

Balance, rhythm, spatial orientation and the ability to react to both auditory and visual stimulus have all been identified as elements of coordination. In fact, the development of good coordination is a multi-tiered sequence that progress from skills performed with good spatial awareness but without speed, to skills performed at increased speeds and in a constantly changing environment. As Joseph Drabik points out, coordination is best developed between the ages of 7 14, with the most crucial period being between 10 13 years of age.

As with anything else, an important issue with respect to coordination development is to provide stimulus that is specific (and therefore appropriate) for the individual. Prescribing drills that are either too easy or too difficult for the young athlete will have a less than optimal result.

An interesting note, as I have suggested in past articles, is that there appears to be a cap with respect to coordination development and ability. Younger athletes who learn to master the elements associated with good coordination (balance, rhythm, spatial awareness, reaction etc), are far better off then athletes who are not exposed to this kind of exercise stimulation until advanced ages. The ability to optimally develop coordination ends at around the age of 16. This validates the claim that global, early exposure is the key from an athletic development standpoint. Again, global coordination will serve as the basis to develop specific coordination in the teenage years.

In Part Two of this article, I will focus on HOW to develop basic coordination and provide specific exercise examples.

Brian J. Grasso
www.DevelopingAthletics.com


#2 Charlie

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 08:56 PM

Brian,

Thank you so much for sharing this great information. I just bought the Complete Athletic Development and it is fantastic.

Thanks again.

Charlie

#3 sportsbunch

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Posted 28 March 2008 - 12:17 PM

I am glad to hear that people are focusing on developing strength early on in youth sports. This is a much better focus than trying to teach a child how to throw a curveball.
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